7digital software developer Mia Filisch attended the October 28th Velocity conference in Amsterdam. She was kind enough to share her account of the core takeaways here with us. She found that the core recurring theme around security was enough to inspire some internal knowledge sharing sessions she has already started scheming on. The diversity of insights led to a productive and informative conference. See below for her notes.

 

Key takeaways from specific sessions:

Docker Tutorial (John Willis)

  • If you haven’t worked much with Docker yet, the slides for this tutorial might be useful to you - they are a general walk-through with both explanation of concepts, products, some hints at best practices and practical exercises for consolidation: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ofxgoout0287ca8/Docker_Training%20-%20Base%20Copy.pdf

  • Be aware it’s pretty long (at Velocity the session took 3hs and that was with him actually skipping all the exercises), but it really does cover a lot.

 

Using Docker Safely (Adrian Mouat)

 

Tracking Vulnerabilities In Your Node.js Dependencies (Guy Podjarny & Assaf Hefetz)

 

Managing Secrets At Scale (Alex Schoof)

  • Hugely valuable talk, well worth reviewing. Slides are here.

  • Some key considerations:

    • Secrets are everywhere, whether we think of them or not

    • As an industry, we don’t currently tend to manage secrets very well (even when bearing in mind that security is always about trade-offs)

    • Secret management should be considered tier 0 / core infrastructure (should be highly available, have monitoring, alerting and access control)

  • In light of this, Schoof proposed the following core principles of modern secret management:

    1. The set of actors who can do something should be as small as possible
    2. Secrets need to expire (set up efficient, easy ways to do secret rotation - this shouldn't require a deploy) ((This also implies that secrets shouldn't be in version control))
    3. It should be easier to handle secrets in secure ways than insecure ways
    4. Security of a system is only as strong as its weakest access link
    5. Secrets must be highly available (as they will stop the basic functioning of apps if they aren't)
  • The talk went on to discuss all the various aspects of building a secret management system, which I’ll leave up to you to follow along via the slides, it was quite interesting.

  • Existing services that were discussed and recommended in the talk were: Vault, Keywhiz and CredStash, but all of these solutions are still pretty new, so with any of them there’ll probably still be quite a bit of tweaking required to get a management system in place that works well.

 

Seeing the Invisible: Discovering Operations Expertise (John Allspaw)

  • John Allspaw reveals what he gets up to in his free time, i.e. pursuing an MA in “Human Factors and Systems Safety” at Lund University Sweden (obviously).

  • His own research explores the area of human factors in web engineering, both with respect to understanding catastrophic failures, but also with respect to understanding the human factors involved in not having catastrophic failures in the face of things potentially going wrong literally all the time. Human Factor & Ergonomics (HFE) research has a long history in areas like aviation, surgery and mining, but for our industry is still relatively under-researched.

 

Blame, Language, Learning: Tips For Learning From Incidents (Lindsay Holmwood)

  • Good talk on maximising learning and minimising blame when dealing with incidents; an article version of the talk can be found here: http://fractio.nl/2015/10/30/blame-language-sharing/

  • TL;DR: The language we use and views we hold when talking about failure shape the outcome of that discussion, and what we learn for the future.

  • Both “Why” and “How” questions tend to limit the scope of our inquiry into incidents; instead “What” questions are a much better device for building empathy, and also help focusing the analysis on foresight - rather than it’s less constructive counterpart hindsight, which more easily falls prey to various cognitive bias and to blameful thinking.

  • Always assume local rationality: “people make what they consider to be the best decision given the information available to them at the time.” - there isn't really a just culture that doesn't revolve around this premise.

 

Alert Overload: Adopting A Microservices Architecture Without Being Overwhelmed With Noise (Sarah Wells)

  • No huge surprises but a good summary on how to set up useful alerts - below are some key points discussed.
  • Focus on business functionality:

    • Look at architecture and decide which parts or relationships are crucial to your core functionalities

    • Decide what it is that you care about for each - speed? errors? throughput? ...

  • Focus on End-to-End - ideally you only want an alert where you actually need to take action

  • Make alerts useful, build with support in mind!

    • readability! (eg. use spaces rather than camel casing etc.)

    • add links to more information or useful lookups

    • provide helpful messages

  • If most people filter out most of the email alerts they are getting, you should probably fix your alert system.

  • Have radiators everywhere; things like http://dashing.io/ are great for dashboards.

  • Setting up an alert is part of fixing an issue!

  • Alerts need continuous cultivation, they are never finished.

  • Make sure you would know it if your alert system went down!

 

The Definition Of Normal: An Intro and guide to anomaly detection (Alois Reitbauer)

  • As anomaly detection has a nice role to play in spotting issues early (ideally before any really bad things happen), I was really excited about this talk, but it quickly turned out that if you’re not from a relatively strong maths / stochastics background (like I am not), then you probably need to rely on other people for anomaly detection magic. So the following is a more high-level view.

  • Anomalies are defined as events or observations that don’t conform to an expected pattern.

  • As such, the anomaly detection workflow is:

    1. use actual data to define / calculate what is ‘normal’, i.e. define your ‘normal model’
    2. the ‘normal model’ is continuously updated with new data
    3. hypotheses are derived from the ‘normal model’
    4. events are checked against your hypotheses, applying a likeliness judgement
    5. how the event performs against this likeliness judgement translates into whether it is an anomaly or not
  • How to approach setting the baselines which define your normal model? One thing to bear in mind that some of them (such as mean/average or median) don’t learn very well. The presenter recommended using exponential smoothing instead, since it is both easy to calculate and learns very well.

 

A Real-Life Account Of Moving 100% To A Public Cloud (Julien Simon / Antoine Guy)

  • Their company Viadeo moved to AWS for reasons not too dissimilar from our own, and like us they moved over gradually. I just wanted to note down some of the key lessons they learned in the process:

    1. Outline your key objectives!
    2. Plan and build with a temporary hybrid run in mind - be able to roll back etc.
    3. Ahead of the move, have a thorough report of your infrastructure - estimate equivalent cost in cloud; evaluate each for replacement (PaaS, Saas or leave as is?); identify pain points (tech debt; relevance of moving legacy apps?)
    4. Define a high-level migration plan
    5. Tech is only half the work - identify all stakeholders and their goals; involve Legal/Finance early (especially if you might have to battle early terminations of legacy infrastructure contracts), work on awareness and knowledge transfer across teams
 

WebPageTest using real mobile apps (Steve Souders)

  • WebPageTest.org now offer a few “Real Mobile Networks” test locations - only a handful for the time being, but if they extend this it could be pretty interesting for us testing client web apps from different locations etc.!

  • Go to www.webpagetest.org > enter web page URL > select one of the “Real Mobile Networks” options.

  • The full talk was less than 7min (!), if you are interested in some context and caveats: https://youtu.be/fg0L0UXZhkI

 

Further nifty resources:

  • There’s a pretty neat collection of relevant free O’Reilly eBooks collated here.

  • All the keynote talks (including those I already highlighted above) can be watched here; unfortunately it doesn’t currently look like they’ll make the full-length talks available to the public.

  • Slides of all sessions (where speakers have chosen to share them) can be found here.

     

Tag: 
Conference
Security
Velocity
Docker
Operations
Language Learning
anna.siegel@7digital.com
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 04:20

Today marks the beginning of the Technical Academy Tour as Academy Coordinator, Miles Pool, VP Technology, Paul Shannon and later, former apprentice, Mia Filisch head out across the UK to talk about our Technical Academy.

 

Continuous learning has always been part of the culture at 7digital and the Technical Academy allowed us to focus those ideas and start hiring apprentices. Changing the team entry requirements and providing a defined period of training allowed us to attract people from more diverse backgrounds and has increased the proportion of female developers in our team; it’s also strengthened the culture of learning and knowledge sharing at every level.

Emma-Ashley Liles
Monday, April 4, 2016 - 13:48

Since I started at 7digital I’ve loved our belief in continuous improvement. Throughout our history as a company we have had a number of influential women working in various parts of organisation yet I knew there was more we could do to improve the diversity of our tech team.

 

Anonymous
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 18:30

Here at 7digital, we see the relationship between the customer and the developer as one of the most important aspects of software development. We treat software development as more of a craft than an engineering discipline. Craftsmen back in the day would have constant communication with their customers, receiving regular visits from their customer to discuss progress and alterations as the item takes shape.

 

Over the last twenty years, the agile software movement and extreme programming in particular has championed this with its short iterations, customer showcases and active customer participation in the creation of features.

 

Anonymous
Friday, July 17, 2015 - 20:18

by Alan Hannaway, 7digital Product Owner for Data 

We often ask ourselves How different do you think our listening experience will be in the next ten years? It’s a difficult question to answer, but a great one to ask. Serving an industry where there is constant change, the question brings us right back to where we should be focused: the way people experience music and radio.

Having powered music and radio services for over 10 years, 7digital knows how to deliver listening experiences that delight millions of people. We regularly reflect on what works, and what doesn’t. Sometimes it is clear what works well, and if you have a culture where you fail early and loudly (we do; it is part of our tech manifesto) you can sometimes see exactly what you did wrong. It’s not always easy though, and when the reason for something happening is not at all clear, finding out why it happened is difficult. How can you make sure the reasons you say something happened, are because of the reason you have identified? Correlation does not imply causation.