Today marks the beginning of the Technical Academy Tour as Academy Coordinator, Miles Pool, VP Technology, Paul Shannon and later, former apprentice, Mia Filisch head out across the UK to talk about our Technical Academy.

 

Continuous learning has always been part of the culture at 7digital and the Technical Academy allowed us to focus those ideas and start hiring apprentices. Changing the team entry requirements and providing a defined period of training allowed us to attract people from more diverse backgrounds and has increased the proportion of female developers in our team; it’s also strengthened the culture of learning and knowledge sharing at every level.

 

Our talk will feature on Thursday 12th May 2016 at Agile Manchester, followed by a shorter version and the publication of our paper on the subject at XP2016 in Edinburgh at the end of May 2016. The full talk will be back with Mia assisting Paul in Falmouth for Agile on the Beach in early September 2016. We’ve already had our practice run at JUST EAT’s offices so if you can’t attend any of these events and want to learn about our experience, please let us know and we might be able to come and see you.

 

The talk and paper cover the 3 iterations of the Technical Academy. We talk about the problem we were trying to solve and how we kicked off the whole idea in 2012. We’ll cover the key changes we made throughout the 3 iterations bringing in pull based learning, product team led projects and self-led learning sessions to name a few. We can then show some of the positive changes we’ve seen in the team, and an insight into the effect on some of our team metrics.

 

Follow @7digitalTech or hashtag #techacademytour for updates

 

Paul Shannon and Miles Pool enjoy a pint at the pub! 

 

 

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sharri.morris@7digital.com
Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 16:14

Over the last month we've started using ServiceStack for a couple of our api endpoints. We're hosting these projects on a debian squeeze vm using nginx and mono. We ran into various problems along the way. Here's a breakdown of what we found and how we solved the issues we ran into. Hopefully you'll find this useful. (We'll cover deployment/infrastructure details in a second post.)

Overriding the defaults

Some of the defaults for ServiceStack are in my opinion not well suited to writing an api. This is probably down to the frameworks desire to be a complete web framework. Here's our current default implementation of AppHost:

 

For me, the biggest annoyance was trying to find the DefaultContentType setting. I found some of the settings unintuitive to find, but it's not like you have to do it very often!

Timing requests with StatsD

As you can see, we've added a StatsD feature which was very easy to add. It basically times how long each request took and logs it to statsD. Here's how we did it:

 

It would have been nicer if we could wrap the request handler but that kind of pipeline is foreign to the framework and as such you need to subscribe to the begin and end messages. There's probably a better way of recording the time spent but hey ho it works for us.

sharri.morris@7digital.com
Sunday, September 16, 2012 - 11:31

At 7digital we use Ajax to update our basket without needing to refresh the page. This provides a smoother experience for the user, but makes it a little more effort to automate our acceptance tests with [Watir](http://wtr.rubyforge.org/). Using timeouts is one way to wait for the basket to render, but it has two issues. If the timeout is too high, it forces all your tests to run slowly even if the underlying callback responds quickly. However if the timeout is too low, you risk intermittent fails any time the callback responds slowly. To avoid this you can use the [Watir `wait_until` method](http://wtr.rubyforge.org/rdoc/classes/Watir/Waiter.html#M000343), to poll for a situation where you know the callback has succeeded. This is more inline with how a real user will behave. ### Example

sharri.morris@7digital.com
Friday, September 14, 2012 - 13:21

At 7digital we use [Cucumber](http://cukes.info/) and [Watir](http://wtr.rubyforge.org/) for running acceptance tests on some of our websites. These tests can help greatly in spotting problems with configuration, databases, load balancing, etc that unit testing misses. But because the tests exercise the whole system, from the browser all the way through the the database, they can tend be flakier than unit tests. Then can fail one minute and work the next, which can make debugging them a nightmare. So, to make the task of spotting the cause of failing acceptance tests easier, how about we set up Cucumber to take a screenshot of the desktop (and therefore browser) any time a scenario fails. ## Install Screenshot Software The first thing we need to do is install something that can take screenshots. The simplest solution I found is a tiny little windows app called [SnapIt](http://90kts.com/blog/2008/capturing-screenshots-in-watir/). It takes a single screenshot of the primary screen and saves it to a location of your choice. No more, no less. * [Download SnapIt](http://90kts.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/snapit.exe) and save it a known location (e.g.

sharri.morris@7digital.com
Monday, September 3, 2012 - 11:51

[TeamCity](http://www.jetbrains.com/teamcity/) is a great continuous integration server, and has brilliant built in support for running [NUnit](http://www.nunit.org/) tests. The web interface updates automatically as each test is run, and gives immediate feedback on which tests have failed without waiting for the entire suite to finish. It also keeps track of tests over multiple builds, showing you exactly when each test first failed, how often they fail etc. If like me you are using [Cucumber](http://cukes.info/) to run your acceptance tests, wouldn't it be great to get the same level of TeamCity integration for every Cucumber test. Well now you can, using the `TeamCity::Cucumber::Formatter` from the TeamCity 5.0 EAP release. JetBrains, the makers of TeamCity, released a [blog post demostrating the Cucumber test integration](http://blogs.jetbrains.com/ruby/2009/08/testing-rubymine-with-cucumber/), but without any details in how to set it up yourself. So I'll take you through it here.