Today marks the beginning of the Technical Academy Tour as Academy Coordinator, Miles Pool, VP Technology, Paul Shannon and later, former apprentice, Mia Filisch head out across the UK to talk about our Technical Academy.

 

Continuous learning has always been part of the culture at 7digital and the Technical Academy allowed us to focus those ideas and start hiring apprentices. Changing the team entry requirements and providing a defined period of training allowed us to attract people from more diverse backgrounds and has increased the proportion of female developers in our team; it’s also strengthened the culture of learning and knowledge sharing at every level.

 

Our talk will feature on Thursday 12th May 2016 at Agile Manchester, followed by a shorter version and the publication of our paper on the subject at XP2016 in Edinburgh at the end of May 2016. The full talk will be back with Mia assisting Paul in Falmouth for Agile on the Beach in early September 2016. We’ve already had our practice run at JUST EAT’s offices so if you can’t attend any of these events and want to learn about our experience, please let us know and we might be able to come and see you.

 

The talk and paper cover the 3 iterations of the Technical Academy. We talk about the problem we were trying to solve and how we kicked off the whole idea in 2012. We’ll cover the key changes we made throughout the 3 iterations bringing in pull based learning, product team led projects and self-led learning sessions to name a few. We can then show some of the positive changes we’ve seen in the team, and an insight into the effect on some of our team metrics.

 

Follow @7digitalTech or hashtag #techacademytour for updates

 

Paul Shannon and Miles Pool enjoy a pint at the pub! 

 

 

Tag: 
Tech Academy
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community
Training
sharri.morris@7digital.com
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 12:49

I wanted to start looking at alternatives to our current set of cucumber feature tests. At the moment on the web team we're using using FireWatir and Capybara. So I though I'd take at look at what was available in Node.js. Many people think it's strange that a .Net shop would use a something written for testing Ruby or even consider something that isn't from the .Net community. Personally I think it's a benefit to truly look at something form the outside in.  Should it matter what you're using to drive your end product or what language your using to test it? Not really. So what are the motivations for moving away from Ruby, Capybara and FireWatir? In a word 'flaky', we've had heaps of issues getting our feature tests, AATs and smoke tests reliable. When it comes to testing, consistency should be king. They should be as solid as your unit tests.  If they fail you want to know that for definite you've broken something, rather than thinking it's a problem with the webdriver. It is with this aim in mind that I started looking at the following. Cucumber.js is definitely in it's infancy, there's lots of stuff missing but there's enough there to get going. Zombie.js is a headless browser, it claims to be insanely fast, no complaints here.

sharri.morris@7digital.com
Tuesday, March 17, 2015 - 12:44

After seeing some relative success in our Solr implementations xml response times by switching on Tomcats http gzip compression, I've been doing some comparisons between the other formats solr can return. We use Solrnet, an excellent open source .NET Solr client. At the moment, it only supports xml responses, but every request sends the "Accept-encoding:gzip" header as standard, so all you have to do is switch it on on your server and you've got some nicely compressed responses. There is talk of supporting javabin de-serialisation, but it's not there yet. I've decided to compare the following using curl with 1000 rows and 10000 rows in json, javabin, json/gzip compressed and javabin/gzip compressed.

anna.siegel@7digital.com
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 12:27

 

Following changes to our Catalogue API, we are releasing a change to the Basket API to support premium quality formats.

This release adds a package element below basketItem in all basket responses. This is to support the sale of music in different audio formats.

An example response would now look like this:

Anonymous
Tuesday, February 3, 2015 - 03:08

Guest Blog by John Nye on His First Week at 7digital

I have recently started at 7digital and already there are a few things of note that may seem small, but highlight the differences in attitude 7digital take over other companies I have worked for. Below are a few thoughts from my first week at 7digital.

Day 1 - Meet the team

After an incredibly frustrating start, owing to a 4 hour delay on my train journey, I was introduced to everyone, given my security pass and directed to a new starter guide that had a series of tasks that needed to be completed. These tasks ranged from installing software to getting added to email groups to reading up on the 7digital handbooks. So I logged into my Ubuntu machine and started going through the list... wait... Ubuntu?

Thoughts from the day:

  • Incredibly welcoming bunch.
  • Locate an Ubuntu book!

Day 2 - Empowerment