Today marks the beginning of the Technical Academy Tour as Academy Coordinator, Miles Pool, VP Technology, Paul Shannon and later, former apprentice, Mia Filisch head out across the UK to talk about our Technical Academy.

 

Continuous learning has always been part of the culture at 7digital and the Technical Academy allowed us to focus those ideas and start hiring apprentices. Changing the team entry requirements and providing a defined period of training allowed us to attract people from more diverse backgrounds and has increased the proportion of female developers in our team; it’s also strengthened the culture of learning and knowledge sharing at every level.

 

Our talk will feature on Thursday 12th May 2016 at Agile Manchester, followed by a shorter version and the publication of our paper on the subject at XP2016 in Edinburgh at the end of May 2016. The full talk will be back with Mia assisting Paul in Falmouth for Agile on the Beach in early September 2016. We’ve already had our practice run at JUST EAT’s offices so if you can’t attend any of these events and want to learn about our experience, please let us know and we might be able to come and see you.

 

The talk and paper cover the 3 iterations of the Technical Academy. We talk about the problem we were trying to solve and how we kicked off the whole idea in 2012. We’ll cover the key changes we made throughout the 3 iterations bringing in pull based learning, product team led projects and self-led learning sessions to name a few. We can then show some of the positive changes we’ve seen in the team, and an insight into the effect on some of our team metrics.

 

Follow @7digitalTech or hashtag #techacademytour for updates

 

Paul Shannon and Miles Pool enjoy a pint at the pub! 

 

 

Tag: 
Tech Academy
Events
community
Training
Emma-Ashley Liles
Monday, April 4, 2016 - 13:48

Since I started at 7digital I’ve loved our belief in continuous improvement. Throughout our history as a company we have had a number of influential women working in various parts of organisation yet I knew there was more we could do to improve the diversity of our tech team.

 

Anonymous
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 18:30

Here at 7digital, we see the relationship between the customer and the developer as one of the most important aspects of software development. We treat software development as more of a craft than an engineering discipline. Craftsmen back in the day would have constant communication with their customers, receiving regular visits from their customer to discuss progress and alterations as the item takes shape.

 

Over the last twenty years, the agile software movement and extreme programming in particular has championed this with its short iterations, customer showcases and active customer participation in the creation of features.

 

Mia.Filisch
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 20:10

7digital software developer Mia Filisch attended the October 28th Velocity conference in Amsterdam. She was kind enough to share her account of the core takeaways here with us. She found that the core recurring theme around security was enough to inspire some internal knowledge sharing sessions she has already started scheming on. The diversity of insights led to a productive and informative conference. See below for her notes.

 

Key takeaways from specific sessions:

Anonymous
Friday, July 17, 2015 - 20:18

by Alan Hannaway, 7digital Product Owner for Data 

We often ask ourselves How different do you think our listening experience will be in the next ten years? It’s a difficult question to answer, but a great one to ask. Serving an industry where there is constant change, the question brings us right back to where we should be focused: the way people experience music and radio.

Having powered music and radio services for over 10 years, 7digital knows how to deliver listening experiences that delight millions of people. We regularly reflect on what works, and what doesn’t. Sometimes it is clear what works well, and if you have a culture where you fail early and loudly (we do; it is part of our tech manifesto) you can sometimes see exactly what you did wrong. It’s not always easy though, and when the reason for something happening is not at all clear, finding out why it happened is difficult. How can you make sure the reasons you say something happened, are because of the reason you have identified? Correlation does not imply causation.