After seeing some relative success in our Solr implementations xml response times by switching on Tomcats http gzip compression, I've been doing some comparisons between the other formats solr can return. We use Solrnet, an excellent open source .NET Solr client. At the moment, it only supports xml responses, but every request sends the "Accept-encoding:gzip" header as standard, so all you have to do is switch it on on your server and you've got some nicely compressed responses. There is talk of supporting javabin de-serialisation, but it's not there yet. I've decided to compare the following using curl with 1000 rows and 10000 rows in json, javabin, json/gzip compressed and javabin/gzip compressed.

My test setup is a solr 1.4 instance with around 11000 records in sitting behind an nginx reverse proxy handling the gzip compression. As I said, this could easily be achieved by switching on gzip compression in Apache Tomcat. The same 10000 records, returned using the q=*:* directive with wt=json when http gzip compressed is the smallest, but only marginally, compared to wt=javabin. It would seem that json compresses very well indeed. You can also see the massive drop just switching on gzip compression gives to xml.

My conclusion to this would be that because json is a widely accepted content-type, with many well known and fast de-serialising libraries, it would probably be worth implementing that rather than trying to de-serialise javabin. But this was only a quick test and does't take into account how quickly solr handles serialisation of the documents server-side.

Tag: 
Solr
anna.siegel@7digital.com
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 04:20

Today marks the beginning of the Technical Academy Tour as Academy Coordinator, Miles Pool, VP Technology, Paul Shannon and later, former apprentice, Mia Filisch head out across the UK to talk about our Technical Academy.

 

Continuous learning has always been part of the culture at 7digital and the Technical Academy allowed us to focus those ideas and start hiring apprentices. Changing the team entry requirements and providing a defined period of training allowed us to attract people from more diverse backgrounds and has increased the proportion of female developers in our team; it’s also strengthened the culture of learning and knowledge sharing at every level.

Emma-Ashley Liles
Monday, April 4, 2016 - 13:48

Since I started at 7digital I’ve loved our belief in continuous improvement. Throughout our history as a company we have had a number of influential women working in various parts of organisation yet I knew there was more we could do to improve the diversity of our tech team.

 

Anonymous
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 18:30

Here at 7digital, we see the relationship between the customer and the developer as one of the most important aspects of software development. We treat software development as more of a craft than an engineering discipline. Craftsmen back in the day would have constant communication with their customers, receiving regular visits from their customer to discuss progress and alterations as the item takes shape.

 

Over the last twenty years, the agile software movement and extreme programming in particular has championed this with its short iterations, customer showcases and active customer participation in the creation of features.

 

Mia.Filisch
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 20:10

7digital software developer Mia Filisch attended the October 28th Velocity conference in Amsterdam. She was kind enough to share her account of the core takeaways here with us. She found that the core recurring theme around security was enough to inspire some internal knowledge sharing sessions she has already started scheming on. The diversity of insights led to a productive and informative conference. See below for her notes.

 

Key takeaways from specific sessions: